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| Saturday July 23, 2016
 
International Date Line bug caused navigation problems
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A software glitch forced 12 United States Air Force F-22A Raptor stealth fighters to cancel their first overseas flight, forcing them to turn back after suffering problems with their navigation systems.
26-02-2007 - Hickam AFB, Hawaii -- Retired Air Force general Don Shepperd told CNN Television that the onboard navigation, communications and fuel systems crashed as the planes crossed the International Date Line.

The problem seems to have arisen not from the time change, but from the change in longitude from W179.99 degrees to E180 which occurs on the International Date Line.

The USAF refused to specify the cause of the issue saying only that the aircraft "experienced a software problem involving the navigation system en route from Hickam to Kadena".

For "operational security reasons" the USAF declined to discuss specific aircraft systems or locations.

The F-22A Raptors reportedly had to turn round and return to Hawaii using only visual contact with their tankers.

A Raptor gets fuel from a KC-10 tanker during a training flight in august 2005

The Raptors returned safely, but the situation may have been disastrous if they had not been with their tankers or the weather had turned bad.

The Raptors have since made it to Kadena with more than 250 personnel from the 27th Fighter Squadron, Langley Air Force Base in Virginia, as part of a scheduled rotational assignment lasting 90 to 120 days.

Source: vnunet.com

COMMENTS:

yah....how could such problem be overlooked by, as they claim, the best minds of the USA....

paloma | posted on Feb 27, 2007 @ 04:43


You just don't know how many times all the software programs had to be worked and reworked to get all the bugs out to begin with. That bird is a flying computer. Cntl alt delete and start over. lol Of all the millions of codes in all the systems, to have just one bad one at this time is pretty amazing.

Ed | posted on Feb 27, 2007 @ 13:16


Should'nt the int'l dateline longitudes read W269 to E270 instead of W179 to E180 as printed?

mike valentine | posted on Feb 28, 2007 @ 04:24


it's amazing, but not pretty, lol. they should remember they are not flying an only "one-thousand-dollar-flying-computer". if they can overlook such basic issue, they have a real problem. there's a fine line between winning and losing. they look "stupid' with that incomprehensible glitch in a very sophisticated, they say, piece of war machine. do your homework!!!!!

paloma | posted on Feb 28, 2007 @ 16:08


i like the f-22

dj hurt | posted on Feb 28, 2007 @ 17:02


Hmmm, it looks like either they
a) turned off exception handling, effectively castrating an elegant, highly effective language
or
b) wrote that section of code in some other language. (Only about 90% of the 1.7M lines of code are in Ada.)
My professional opinion would be "a". Some bean-counting pseudo manager made the decision to over-optimize the language, and "damn the effects". In a normal, well-written piece of Ada code an exception such as this would have been well-handled. (Not to mention that they obviously didn't do range checking on inputs!!!)


Brian | posted on Mar 01, 2007 @ 02:38


That's happening more in software design. The most unlikely scenarios are covered, but the big picture is overlooked.

However, the Raptor is an impressive achievement from a technological point of view.

Jeff | posted on Mar 01, 2007 @ 14:35


well, this is indeed a thing of beauty.

paloma | posted on Mar 01, 2007 @ 16:03


It is a totally unacceptable situation that should have never made it past the integration lab, definitely not past flight test. I say this as a 20+ year aerospace system & software engineer on real-time embedded operational flight programs of four US aircraft programs, plus other types of large systems, with specialization experience in areas including navigation, flight planning, fuel systems among others. Test, test and test. Then test more.

John | posted on Mar 06, 2007 @ 18:01


how could something happen to such a high tech plane?
actually im disapointed in it but they should fix the problem soon. at least no one was hurt

Lucas | posted on Mar 06, 2007 @ 18:23


Can I suggest testing a flight South of the equator too :-)

trevor masters | posted on Mar 09, 2007 @ 00:37


And a test flight over the north and south pole?

Barbara | posted on Mar 09, 2007 @ 00:57


Y2K anyone? You are now flying in the other direction.

Matt | posted on Mar 09, 2007 @ 12:42


All F-22s shoud have gone though certain tests again.

Edward | posted on Mar 11, 2007 @ 02:09


You separate design from operation. It was quality control issue that could have resulted in mission failure. This incident could still go into evaluation books.

Jack | posted on Mar 20, 2007 @ 00:27


This bird has me wishing I was'nt 37 and could change professions to be an Air Force pilot. I would devote my being to fly this thing.

Jon | posted on Mar 20, 2007 @ 23:26


Hi I am 12 years old and my dream is to be a Raptor pilot.I love the thought of flying in this freedom bird.I fly on flight simulator 10 or X and i am great at flying on that and i am hoping that my dad will let me get my pilots license when I become 16 years old.I have been dreaming of flying this plane for about 5 years and I am still going for my dream.I heard that the USAF is only making 182 Raptors so I want to go to the United States Air Force Academy!!!I am not a strait A student soo i might not get in and will need to go through ROTC.I have learned a lot about planes and the Air Force and have tons of plane video games.As you can tell I look up info about planes and the Air Force.My dad encourages my hard work and he was a navigator on a KC135 and retired from the USAF about 3 years ago after 20 years of service in the Air Force.

Ian | posted on Mar 23, 2007 @ 23:51


Hi I am 12 years old and my dream is to be a Raptor pilot.I love the thought of flying in this freedom bird.I fly on flight simulator 10 or X and i am great at flying on that and i am hoping that my dad will let me get my pilots license when I become 16 years old.I have been dreaming of flying this plane for about 5 years and I am still going for my dream.I heard that the USAF is only making 182 Raptors so I want to go to the United States Air Force Academy!!!I am not a strait A student soo i might not get in and will need to go through ROTC.I have learned a lot about planes and the Air Force and have tons of plane video games.As you can tell I look up info about planes and the Air Force.My dad encourages my hard work and he was a navigator on a KC135 and retired from the USAF about 3 years ago after 20 years of service in the Air Force.

Ian | posted on Mar 23, 2007 @ 23:52


You might want to work on that double posting first ;-)

Is it really any surprise that a piece of equipment built by the lowest bidder, has problems?

anon | posted on Mar 27, 2007 @ 17:15


Ian, you sound just like another young man I know. He too got the flying bug at a very young age and when he found out there was such a thing as The Air Force Academy he sat out to to get there. You don't have to have a 4.0 grade average, he didn't, but you do need to be a good well rounded student. Involve yourself in as many things as possible, i.e. sports, clubs, scouts and of course JRROTC. I don't know how he had time to do everything he did, but he made time because he had the goal. July 1986 he reached that first goal, USAFA. I say first goal because his ultimate goal was to be a fighter pilot, in particular a F-16 pilot. But, when he graduated from pilot training there weren't any F-16s on the drop so he had to take an F-15c. Poor boy. :) Now, 10 May 2007 he will take command of the 90th fighter squadron, our newest F-22 squadron, at Elmendorf AFB, and I'll be there! He would be the first to tell you NEVER give up your dream. Work had and apply to all the academies. You never know, you may get an appointment to all of them as he did. But, never give up that dream or let anything get in the way of that goal.

Ed | posted on Mar 29, 2007 @ 13:47


That sounds pretty awesome Ed. I want to go into the Air Force to, maybe even go to the Air Force Academy. I'm going to start on my private pilots license, when i'm old enough. Maybe next year when i turn 15. We'll see if my eyesight and other phyisical requirements, stay good enough to qualify to be a pilot, or go to the Air Force Academy.

Jeremy | posted on Mar 29, 2007 @ 21:58


Jeremy, I'll tell you the same thing I told Ian. Work hard for it. Michael was born in Feb. so he didn't gradulate from HS until he was 18. He started flying when he was 15 and by the time he left for the Academy he not only had his private ticket, but also multi-engine ticket with over 200 hours flight time. He went to CAP camp between his Jr and Sr year of HS wearing pilots wings! So, it's not too early to start working toward that goal. Scouts is a good place to start. Get envolved and work hard. I never pushed him, didn't have too. It was something he wanted. His mother certainly didn't push him, she hates flying. lol

Ed | posted on Mar 29, 2007 @ 23:16


It's been a dream of mine to fly this bird too Ian. I've been watching this plane come from concept to prototype to the real deal. And now on April 21 (i think) I'll actually have been able to watch this beauty in flight. It's going to be an awsome day! :-)

Chris | posted on Apr 03, 2007 @ 05:40


Yeah I saw two fly over at the Cleveland air show last summer. Man they are loud! I don't even think they had there after burners on.

Jeremy | posted on Apr 03, 2007 @ 20:02


Real men fly props and the real heros died flying piston engines. Those guys were pilots not button pushers.

Tony | posted on Jun 22, 2007 @ 23:36


Perfect work!

Jackson | posted on Jun 26, 2007 @ 01:31


It would be cool to be a pilot...but my eye site sucks. At least I got into the Air Force though, Kinda hard these days.

chase | posted on Nov 06, 2007 @ 07:24


I am writing a wrap up article about the bugs that F-22 has experienced so far. The most recent, worrisome, life-threatening & undoable bug I've been tipped off about is paneling failure in the F-22. Atop this, the oxygen level decrease in 11 test flights has compelled many USAF pilots to avoid flying this aircraft. Someone promised to make a DoD, USAF official read my research about the bugs when finished. I really hope they get a knock in their brains about these bugs just once & for all. The best pilots of USAF fly this aircraft, and no DoD official, No USAF personnel, Not me, & certainly no American would want to lose their best pilots in pairs for flying an aircraft which is experiencing bugs because some quality testing officers had few extra bottles of beer the night before.

Mustafa | posted on May 04, 2012 @ 19:04


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